Education of Medical Students in the Robotic Surgery Operating Room

Ankara Yildirim Beyazit University Medical Students Have the Opportunity to Learn by Watching Live Robotic Urological Surgical Procedures in the Operating Room

Dr A. Erdem Canda
Editor-in-chief, European Medical Journal Urology
Member of the Robotic Urology Working Group of Young Academic Urologists (YAU), European Association of Urology (EAU)
Deputy Dean, School of Medicine, Ankara Yildirim Beyazit University
Associate Professor of Urology, Department of Urology, Ankara Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
E-mail: erdemcanda@yahoo.com

Starting from the first year of medical school, our medical students have the opportunity to observe robotic urological procedures in the operating room related to prostate cancer, bladder cancer, kidney cancer, and adrenal diseases. Their experience includes observing patient preparation, preparation of the surgical instruments, surgical steps, and postoperative patient care. They watch the robotic surgical procedures on a 3D monitor. We provide information about the robotic urological procedure that we perform to the medical students, describing the disease and why we perform the surgery. Most importantly, we teach clinical and surgical anatomy while performing robotic surgery, and students have the chance to observe the details of the anatomical structures with magnified vision.

Medical students of Ankara Yildirim Beyazit University are very much interested in robotic surgery. They invited me to give a talk on ‘Robotic Surgery’ on 21st November 2014 that was organised at our medical school building by Yıldırım Beyazıt University Medical School Scientific Research Association. The members of this association are composed of medical students. I would like to thank our medical students for their willingness to learn and also for inviting me to give this talk.

Students in the operating room have the opportunity to ask questions and we are always glad to answer and explain in detail so that the understanding is clear. “I think that teaching anatomy and clinical anatomy to medical students on the large screen whilst performing robotic surgery in the operating room is a very effective teaching and training modality“. Being able to explain key clinical points of the anatomical structure in a practical setting to students who have only a theoretical knowledge can make a significant contribution to their learning.

Opinions of the Medical Students

Medicine is My Passion

A bright, cold ambience awaited me when I first entered the operating room, and I was awakened by the brightness of the lights. I did not know what an operation really entails and I was very excited about it because it was the first time that I would be observing one, hence I was going to learn many new things. The beautiful smiling faces of nurses welcomed me into the operating room and while I was trying to familiarise myself with the new environment, I also learned which types of surgical sterile apparatus I should not touch. I expected myself to become more excited when I saw my university faculty but it was not the case, probably because the polite and professional attitude of the nurses had relaxed me so much.

I waited outside the operating room for half an hour in order for the patient to get themselves prepared for the operation. I was then allowed back inside to observe the procedure. While I was listening to Dr. Erdem Canda’s explanations about the patient’s illness and some important issues that we should be mindful of during the operation, I understood that the ambience of the operating room was not stressful as I first imagined, but it was actually very enjoyable.

There were also guest urologists from different universities inside the operating room. When the surgery began, all of us were focused on the projector, which showcased the operation in its glory. Being a first-grade student, I was listening to what the faculty in the operating room were saying very carefully and asked them about anything that I could not understand in order to fully comprehend the medical jargon. It was a very pleasant experience for me to see the application of theoretical information in real life and, as I said to the professor sitting next to me, “I have just realised that I made a very sensible decision by choosing medicine.” I think that it is not easy to praise someone and, judging by other people’s tributes to Dr Erdem Canda, I understood that our professors were very successful and valuable.

When the operation was over, everyone left the room and perhaps the best part of this experience was that the patient who underwent the surgery was potentially cured of cancer. This observation has also shown me that being a doctor requires sacrifice, which I believe makes it a unique and valuable position in society. Therefore, it allowed me to understand the fact that medicine is my best friend, and my ultimate passion.

Esra Pırıl Ağırbaş
Ankara Yildirim Beyazit University
School of Medicine
Phase 1 Student (English)
E-mail: esrapiril94@gmail.com

I was not familiar with this cancer and treatment before observing this operation. However, it was very educational for me because the surgeons explained every process in detail. Thus, what I learned has become more permanent. After the surgery I could confidently explain this type of cancer, the application of its surgical treatment procedures, and the advantage of robotic surgery to any interested people around me. I can also answer when someone asks questions about this particular cancer and surgery.

Ezgi Evgallioğlu
Ankara Yildirim Beyazit University
School of Medicine
Phase 1 Student (English)
E-mail:
eevgallioglu@gmail.com

First of all, I would like to thank those who contributed to this event. It was my first experience in an operating room. Before this one, I had watched a lot of operations, but this was so different to previous occasions. This is because I was in the operating room while the surgeon was operating and we were following him on the screen. At the same time, the other assistant surgeon explained to us what he was doing, meaning that we were able to comprehend most of the procedure. We also learned new terms, for instance digital rectal examination for prostate examination. Additionally, we learned the process of prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment visually. Overall I think it was a very beneficial experience.

Abdüssamet Aslan
Ankara Yildirim Beyazit University
School of Medicine
Phase 1 Student (English)
Email: abdussamed.a@gmail.com

They accepted me into the operating room while Dr. Canda was performing robotic surgery, even though I do not know anything about anatomy or surgery. This enabled me to understand everything that they were doing and where they were in regards to anatomy during the surgery. Due to this, I now understand a little more about medicine. Thank you!

Muhammed Canbolat
Ankara Yildirim Beyazit University
School of Medicine
Phase 1 Student (English)
E-mail: cnblt.mz@gmail.com


Dr Canda with Ankara Yildirim Beyazit University Medical School students in the robotic surgery operating room.


Dr Canda with Ankara Yildirim Beyazit University Medical School students in the Robotic Surgery operating room investigating the prostate.


Dr Canda with Ankara Yildirim Beyazit University Medical School students in the robotic surgery operating room investigating the prostate after the procedure.


One of the medical students investigating the robotic console.


Dr Canda with Ankara Yildirim Beyazit University Medical School students in the robotic surgery operating room investigating the prostate after the procedure.


A group of medical students in front of the robotic arms.


Medical students watching the robotic procedure on the screen in the operating room.


A group of medical students in front of the 3D monitor in the robotic operating room.

    
Dr Canda with Ankara Yildirim Beyazit University Medical School students in the robotic surgery operating room investigating the prostate after the procedure.


One of the medical students investigating the new da Vinci Xi robotic console.


One of the medical students in front of the new da Vinci Xi robotic arms.

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